Tag Archives: history

ONE HUNDRED THINGS TO DO IN GUERNSEY WHEN THE REST OF THE WORLD HAS GONE TO SH*T! NO.21 CHAPEL OF ST APOLLINE

We gave thanks and blessing to the Saint of Dentistry this afternoon;

“Blessed are the fillings, joy to all veneers! Under his implants!”

I have driven by the small church hundreds of times since moving to Guernsey, and today I went over its threshold for the first time! In the Proustian sense of the universe, that’s what I love about this hobbity island – seeing new things with the same old pair of eyeball goggles on! You could literally park a small tractor by the front gate and toddlers can enjoy exploring the garden. We could see that the fae were in residence as there looked to be a doorway at the base of one the trees in the garden. However, we didn’t knock or take any chances that they might just put the kettle on for us and rustle up some biscuits… It is well worth a visit (but don’t visit RIGHT NOW or THE GOVERNMENT will fine you TEN THOUSAND POUNDS – if you don’t have a valid permit).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapel_of_St_Apolline,_Guernsey

It all feels a bit like ‘f*ck off if you’re not from here!’ in G-land at the moment, and that’s sad. We could have all taken in a shielded person from the UK for the duration of the pandemic at this rate. St Appoline lived in Alexandria 249BC and her house still stands – yet we continue to ‘define local’ in a way that betrays the myriad and beautifully rich depth of colour and culture of the island itself. There’s a well of sadness holding up the armpits of any victory cheer we may raise to the skies; all dark and comfortless. Ringing the bell when it’s not a church service gives an air of the impression that if you did such a thing, it may, albeit microcosmically momentarily, take the edge of it. Ring the bell! Up yours corona!

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ONE HUNDRED THINGS TO DO IN GUERNSEY WHEN THE REST OF THE WORLD HAS GONE TO SH*T! NO.18 MONT CHINCHON BATTERY

Mont Chinchon battery was also known as Druids Altar Battery due to its close proximity to Le Trepied dolmen. In 1801 the battery had two 20 pounder cannons which would have been manned by the Guernsey Militia. A magazine was also recorded in 1816, which would have held black powder and shot for the guns. The site was dismantled by the German occupying forces to make way for more modern defences. The construction of a cutting for a railway line also damaged the rear of the battery and the magazine. After the 1940’s the battery fell into disrepair. In 2006 work began to restore the battery and was completed in 2008. 

[source: http://www.museums.gov.gg/batteries%5D
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ONE HUNDRED THINGS TO DO IN GUERNSEY WHEN THE REST OF THE WORLD HAS GONE TO SH*T! NO.5 LE PRIAULX LIBRARY

I want nothing called after my name, and I will give nothing to those who already have much. …. If the money be not properly administered, better it had been thrown in the sea.

Mr Osmond de Beauvoir Priaulx’s original bequest

Before his death Osmond de Beauvoir Priaulx gifted his house at Candie Gardens and his library, to the States of Guernsey, reluctantly. The Priaulx Library was established in perpetuity, and Osmond’s legacy lives on strong. On the Saturday morning that we visited it was buzzing with activity. The shelves of the ‘Family Room’ and ‘Press Room’ in particular were being tussled by visitors. Despite the island’s recent first foray into ‘island-wide-voting’ (IWV) the stacks of government Billet’s bound in leather were largely untouched. (‘Billet‘ pronounced ‘be-ay‘ with a silent Baracus).

“I, a Sarnian, Osmond de Beauvoir Priaulx, have placed my books, the solace of my life, in this library, and given them for ever to the people of Guernsey, in the 82nd year of my life. As they have profited me so may they profit you.”

Osmond softened before death, and was further by others, who bequeathed his library to the island, his name was to be bound to his books and the house forever.

The Library first opened in 1889. Osmond died in 1891 and he was cremated, following his wishes and his urn placed in Candie House, where it remains on view to this day in full view. I am sure that’s why workmen, in 2005, found wards in the rootops to keep the bad spirits away. I would have loved to have had a look around the attic, as well as the forbidden areas of the building. I had wanted to touch the urn itself but the librarians, and their small army of supernatural bookshelf hogoblins no doubt, would have booted me out of there pretty sharpish. I’m sure the basement holds a lot of secrets. For all of the other secrets that the library keeps you can peruse a collection online:

https://www.priaulxlibrary.co.uk/articles

More info here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/guernsey/content/articles/2009/03/02/osmond_de_beauvoir_priaulx_feature.shtml

The Priaulx Library (from Candie Gardens)
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One Hundred Things to do in Guernsey when the rest of the World has gone to Sh*t! No.3 La Vallette Underground Museum

La Valette Underground museum is a treasure trove of remnants leftover by Hitler’s occupying forces in Guernsey, and Alderney. The location was set up to refuel Hitler’s U-Boats, you can still see a tank in situ and smell the gasoline. Other aspects of Guernsey’s military history are covered. The collection is will truly chill you to the bone, and embed how brave and courageous islanders who witnessed local atrocities and lived alongside the Nazis were. This museum is one piece in the jigsaw puzzle of the occupation.

http://lavalette.tk/History.html

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